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Home > News > 2018 > October > A professional to be proud of

A professional to be proud of

WTD_slider.pngToday we celebrate World Teachers’ Day – an important opportunity to thank and congratulate teachers for the invaluable work they do.

 

A teacher’s ability to create opportunity, empower students’ minds and ultimately transform their lives is what makes our profession one to be proud of.

Teaching attracts individuals who want to make a difference to the lives of young people.


For our teacher members, pride in their profession goes hand in hand with this passion.

 

Established in 1994 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), World Teachers’ Day is an opportunity to recognise, thank and congratulate teachers for the invaluable work they do.

 

Teaching: It’s Our Profession

The teaching profession is fundamentally about making high quality, expert judgements in the interests of children and their wellbeing. That is why our union is strongly advocating for teachers’ professional standing to be respected, and their professional judgement to be valued through our national campaign Teaching: It’s Our Profession.

Teachers make hundreds of professional judgements on any given day – and on World Teachers’ Day we thank them for every single one.


Careers devoted to shaping the next generation

Louise Lenzo, an early childhood teacher at The Essington School in Darwin, said even though she has been in the classroom for many years, teaching remained a rewarding profession.

 

“I really get a buzz when a child ‘gets it’. It’s a real high-five proud moment. The excitement in their eyes and on their little faces just makes my day.

 

“Little children are also very demonstrative and keep it real; the teacher is an important figure in their daily life.

 

“To me, the most rewarding aspect of being a teacher is building relationships with the class and parents and setting up the classroom environment so that it’s an inviting, comfortable and safe place to be where children have the opportunity to reach their potential.”

 

St Patrick’s College teacher Luke Vanni said teaching was a career where you could make a difference.

 

“Every day we get to work with young people and give them the opportunity to learn something new about our world,” Luke said.

 

“I think the most rewarding thing about being a teacher is the learning experiences that happen in the classroom; the ‘aha’ moments, the development and growth of students over time and the cohesion that can develop in a group after a year of learning together.”

 

Both Louise and Luke cited technological change as a key challenge for the profession.

 

“Technology is used in our classrooms every day, from interactive games to stories online. Young children now have digital technology lessons. Teaching is more about preparing children to be lifelong learners in a world where job situation is fluid and traditional job opportunities are not the norm,” Louise said.

 

“The increasing presence of computers is a huge change and presents many challenges for both students and teachers. I try to remember that face-to-face interaction is a key part of what we do and ensure that there is always space for that too,” Luke said.

 

Chapter celebrations

IEUA-QNT members acknowledged the day by holding celebrations within their Chapters and considering donations to Union Aid Abroad – APHEDA to support colleague unionists in the developing world.

 

Remember to send any photographs from your Chapter celebrations to communications@qieu.asn.au for inclusion in our union journal, website and social media.

 

Happy World Teachers’ Day!

 

Read more about World Teachers’ Day at www.worldteachersday.com.au